3 Mistakes to Avoid When Getting Your Manuscript Edited.

Every writer wants to perfect their manuscript before getting it published. However, there are 3 mistakes writers can make when getting their book edited which can cost time and money to fix:

  1. Having your manuscript edited by too many editors.
    It’s okay to have different types of editors check your manuscript such as a content editor, a line editor, and a proofreader. However, you risk ruining your story if you have more than one content or line editor going over your manuscript without a good reason. If you’re unsure whether their edits and or suggestions are correct, getting more editors will only confuse you as each editor has their own style. Not to mention, the process will end up being costly. You’re better off having the same editor review your story several times to improve it. One revision isn’t enough because there are always parts that need to be polished off further.

  2. Hiring an unqualified editor.
    Some claim to be editors because they love reading and can spot typos. Being a reader doesn’t qualify a person to be a professional editor, especially when it comes to editing content aspects of a story (i.e. story and character development… etc). It may qualify them to be a beta reader who provides free feedback from a reader’s perspective to the author. However, if you’re paying for an editing service, you want the standard to be good and not butcher your story. When looking for an editor, ensure they have some qualifications in the field and check what genre they edit (you need the right one for your book).

  3. Hiring a cheap editor.
    The proverb — “You get what you pay for” — comes to mind. The cost of editing varies between editors and depends on the type of editing and word count. A good editor isn’t going to be cheap as the process is time-consuming, taking anywhere from 1 to 4 weeks to finish. If the price seems too cheap, don’t expect the editing to be great and or thorough as no sane editor would undervalue their work and time.

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